History repeats itself

You may know about how St. Catherine of Siena wrote Pope Gregory XI in 1376 when he was in Avignon, telling him to go back to Rome. It's a famous story. It gives people a glimpse of how bold Catherine was in the face of power. She was a voice of truth in her own … Continue reading History repeats itself

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Meeting God in the Upper Room (Msgr. Peter Vaghi)

It's an image that is familiar to any Christian. It's been the subject for myriad artists for centuries, from paint-by-number coloring books to DaVinci, Raphael, and the greats. The Upper Room is a source of great mystery while at the same time being the center of several of the most significant events of Revelation. It … Continue reading Meeting God in the Upper Room (Msgr. Peter Vaghi)

Padre Pio: A Personal Portrait (Francesco Napolitano)

Much of what I knew about Padre Pio before reading this book came through stories that seemed apocryphal. They seemed too good to be true. They seemed to be part of the saccharine hagiography that characterizes so much of what is out there. This book changed all that. Fr. Francesco Napolitano knew Padre Pio, worked … Continue reading Padre Pio: A Personal Portrait (Francesco Napolitano)

A lesson in mercy

I'd never read The Merchant of Venice until tonight. And I do not have significant exposure to Shakespeare generally. In this Year of Mercy, I found the discussion of mercy and justice very profound. In Act IV, Scene 1, Portia, acting as the judge, is discussing with Shylock his insistence that Antonio pay a pound of … Continue reading A lesson in mercy

The Billable Hour and the death of the soul

Someone has recently penned an obituary for the billable hour. I'm a lawyer, and I cannot tell you how much I wish it were dead, but I have doubts that it will actually die any time soon. Most law firms are stuck in the outdated mentality that they can only bill in this one way. And it … Continue reading The Billable Hour and the death of the soul